Secession petitions get little support in Riverside County

Remember those petitions that called for states to secede from the United States?

Sociology graduate students at the University of North Carolina analyzed those petitions to find out who was signing them and where the signers were from, and the county-level data shows relatively little support for secession petitions coming from Riverside County residents.

The researchers found that, to sign a secession petition on the White House website, you don’t have to live in the state that you’d like separated from the union, and it seems a number of people are signing multiple petitions. The UNC students analyzed 916,474 signatures and identified 320,900 unique signers, most of whom gave valid locations.

The New Secessionists map shows darker colors for counties with higher levels of support for White House secession petitions on whitehouse.gov. (Screenshot from unc.edu)

The New Secessionists map shows darker colors for counties with higher levels of support for White House secession petitions on whitehouse.gov. (Screenshot from unc.edu)

The 607 petitioners the students plotted in Riverside County make it one of the cooler spots on the national heat map the students produced, given the county’s 2 million-plus population.

Compare that to the 268 signers from Campbell County, Wyoming (population: 563,626) or the 125 from Blanco County, Texas (population: 10,497). It’s worth noting that even in that central Texas hot spot, only about 1 percent of the population signed on to a secession petition.

Back in California, Imperial County’s 174,528 residents were even cooler to the idea of secession than Riverside County’s. Only 13 signers could be plotted there.

READ MORE: The New Secessionists (unc.edu)

HAT TIP: Joe Murphy via Ryan Mark